DHS Graduate Receives National Basketball Awards at Binghamton

Athlete of the Month - John RinaldiBy Steve Svetovich

Dunmore High School graduate John Rinaldi has made the most of his academic-athletic career at Binghamton University where he will graduate this May with a bachelor of science degree in marketing/finance.

And to cap it all off he recently received word that he is the first Binghamton University basketball player chosen for the NCAA National Honor Society and be named to the American East All Academic team.

“It was an honor to hear about all this,” he said, “because my parents always made me work hard at school. They were always on top of me about my grades. It shows that hard work really does pay off.”

Son of Mark and Annie Rinaldi, Dunmore, John is a 2013 Dunmore High School graduate. He played four years of football and basketball at Dunmore. He earned All League status in both sports as a junior and senior. He was a 1,000 points plus career scorer in basketball and was a key member of two district title football teams.

He also played one year of baseball and was a member of the track team for two years. He set records for the high jump and long jump and also participated in the triple jump. He earned a district title for the high jump twice. He was All League twice and All Regional once for track and field.

The scholar-athlete has an impressive 3.6 grade point average at Binghamton University where he is a member of the student advisory committee and four-year member of the basketball team.

Tony Lacertosa was his basketball coach at Dunmore High School. “I played several positions for him,” Rinaldi said. “We learned how to win from him. We had a successful team.”

Like hundreds of other student-athletes, Rinaldi learned many life lessons from Dunmore veteran football coach Jack Henzes. “He is a legend there. Everything you hear about him is true. You have to experience it. We won two district championships under him. He teaches you life lessons and how to be a better person. I experienced it first hand from him.”

Rinaldi said his parents are always strong influences in his life. “They always tell me to work hard in school and in sports. They tell me to play hard and get good grades. They are sticklers for good grades.”

The senior stalwart talked about what it takes to be successful in college basketball. “It’s all about playing hard all the time and taking nothing for granted.”

The dean’s list student said he has enjoyed his four years at Binghamton University. “I like the school environment here and I’m very happy with my college choice. It’s been an amazing four years and it flew by really fast. The basketball experience here has been great.

“It’s going to be a little weird when this is all over. I am going to miss college. I am hoping to get a good job and possibly go to graduate school in the future. It’s been great here.”

BlackOut Design celebrates relocation

BlackOut Design Grand Opening 4.25.16

Guests mingle and enjoy live music by the Coal Town Rounders at BlackOut Design’s grand opening on April 25.

BlackOut Design recently celebrated the relocation of its headquarters with an open house during which more than 100 of the firm’s clients and friends came  together to tour the 1,800 square foot facility located at 527 South Blakely Street, Dunmore. Jack Reager is president of BlackOut.

Spread across three stories, the office space was gutted and renovated to provide efficient, modern work space designed to accelerate decision making and improve communication. While these kinds of offices are the norm for large marketing agencies in metropolitan areas, they are rare in smaller markets like here in Northeastern Pennsylvania.

As part of its commitment to supporting the community, BlackOut Design sourced local talent for both the design and construction of the new space as well as for the grand opening. “From carpenters and painters to musicians and caterers, everyone who helped us through this process has been amazing,” said Reager.

Recently there have been dozens of studies linking the success or failure of personal interactions, performance, and innovation in the workplace to physical space. By combining emerging data with organizational metrics such as total sales or number of new product launches, scientists can demonstrate a workspace’s effect on the bottom line. For businesses like BlackOut, this means no cubicles, beige walls and florescent lighting. Instead, highly networked, shared, multipurpose spaces are the offices of not only the future, but of today.

The new headquarters houses separate areas for both design and development work as well as for strategic planning and business development activities. Each of these designated areas looks and feels differently through the use of varying pieces of furniture (swivel chairs and standing desks versus café tables and benches) but also through the incorporation of different colors, textures and lighting. A client sitting area feels less like a doctor’s waiting room and more like the foyer of a home. And the second floor holds a convertible conference room, designed to ensure when we get around a table with our clients, it feels like home.

“We came to BlackOut with a website that needed to be completely rebuilt from the ground up. Their team’s expertise, innovation, hard work, and patience resulted in modern site that is client-focused and highlights our full-service solutions. We know it wasn’t easy, but they came through in a big way, ” said Borton Lawson Engineering Marketing Manager, Lucy Boardwine.

BlackOut Design is a full service marketing agency with deep experience integrating online marketing with traditional concepts. The agency develops campaigns that span multiple media, all from under one roof.

 

Bucktown businesses among SAGE Award winners

Two Dunmore businesses. Fidelity Bank and DePietro’s Pharmacy, were among the winners announced by The Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce and MetroAction for the 2015 SAGE Awards (Scranton Awards for Growth and Excellence), which honor outstanding local businesses for their talent, creativity and innovation. The winner of each award category was announced at The Chamber Gala on Nov. 11 at The Theater at Lackawanna College.

More than 100 applications were received. A group of community leaders and professionals teamed up to review applications and select finalists. The winners, in each category, are:

BEST PRACTICES IN COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT

  •     Toyota of Scranton

BEST PRACTICES IN CUSTOMER SERVICE

  •     DePietro’s Pharmacy

BEST PRACTICES IN MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS

  •     Design Done Right

BUSINESS OF THE YEAR

  •     DePietro’s Pharmacy

HEALTHY WORKPLACE OF THE YEAR AWARD

  •     MetLife

HOMETOWN STAR

  •     Lackawanna Heritage Valley: Heritage Explorer Bike Tour and Festival

NEW & EMERGING BUSINESS OF THE YEAR

  •     Graham Public Relations and Advertising

NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION OF THE YEAR

  •     NAMI PA Scranton Area Chapter

PRIDE & PROGRESS: EXTERIOR RENOVATIONS

  •     Geisinger-Community Medical Center: 1800 Mulberry Street

PRIDE & PROGRESS: INTERIOR RENOVATIONS

  •     University of Scranton: The Quincy Avenue Apartments and Learning Center

PRIDE & PROGRESS: NEW CONSTRUCTION

  •     University of Scranton: Edward R. Leahy Jr. Hall

PRIDE & PROGRESS: PROJECT OF THE YEAR

  •     University of Scranton: Edward R. Leahy Jr. Hall

SMALL BUSINESS OF THE YEAR

  •     13 Olives

EXCELLENCE IN LEADERSHIP

  •     Fidelity Bank

WOMAN OF EXCELLENCE

  •     Natalie Gelb, Lackawanna Heritage Valley

PEOPLE’S CHOICE AWARD

  • Benco Dental